Friday, April 13, 2012

Biofuel worldwide in Brief: Rapid dominance.

Qantas flies on biofuel
Australian airline Qantas has become the nation's first airline to operate a commercial flight on a 50/50 blend of biofuel and traditional jet fuel.
13 April 2012

Australian airline Qantas has become the nation's first airline to operate a commercial flight on a 50/50 blend of biofuel and traditional jet fuel.


The Airbus A330 flew from Sydney to Adelaide using renewable jet fuel derived from recycled cooking oil.


The airline hopes its biofuel-powered flight will encourage Australia to develop a sustainable, commercial aviation fuel industry.


The biofuel used on the flight has a lifecycle carbon footprint that is 60% smaller than that of conventional jet fuel.


The current price of jet fuel makes it Qantas' largest operational expense, which forced it to increase its fuel surcharge two times in as many months.


Qantas expects its fuel costs to reach $2.25 billion (€1.7 billion) in the six months to June, after a $300 million hike.


The airline has also announced that it is to conduct a feasibility study into the potential for an Australian sustainable aviation fuel industry, backed by funding from the nation's government.

13 April 2012

Qatar Airways is looking to use greener jet fuel in its aircraft in order to lower its GHG emissions and meet CO2 targets.


The airline has said that it plans to invest in California, US-based jet fuel manufacturer Byogy Renewables to produce a cleaner, alcohol-based jet fuel. This would include an investment of up to 10% in addition to an off-take agreement.


The value of the deal has not been disclosed.


Byogy believes its alcohol-to-jet fuel production process will receive support from ASTM International by the end of 2013.

Jet fuel costs rise again
State-owned oil companies increased the price of jet fuel in India for the third time in March.


Qatar plans to be operating a couple of flights on its Europe routes using Byogy's renewable drop-in fuel by the end of 2014.


Using alcohol as a feedstock for aviation fuel would help airlines reduce their carbon output at a time when they are working to adhere to the emissions targets set by the Air Transport Association (ATA). The ATA hopes to stop the growth of emissions from 2020 and slash GHGs by 50% by 2050 compared to 2005 levels.


Qantas hikes fuel surcharges
Australian airline Qantas Airways could increase its surcharges on fuel by 9.7% in a move to remain profitable at a time when jet fuel costs continue to soar