Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Algae Biofuels Australia: Finding suitable sites for algae cultivation in Australia

Finding suitable sites for large-scale algal biofuel plants September 10, 2012 by Jo Manning (Phys.org)—Scientists have for the first time identified a number of WA sites capable of producing large quantities of commercial biofuel from microalgae. Ads by Google Beat Bad Energy Today - Solar Power The Northern Territory Way, Local & Experienced - www.beatbadenergy.com.au They say the best sites for big-scale algal biofuel plants include stretches of land south of Geraldton, south-east of Exmouth and large areas near Karratha and Port Hedland. Professor Michael Borowitzka from Murdoch University's Algae Research and Development Centre and Assistant Professor Bryan Boruff from the School of Earth and Environment at The University of Western Australia used Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology to study more than 2250km of WA coastline from Lancelin to Broome and 170km inland. Their report, Identification of the Optimum Sites for Industrial-scale Microalgae Biofuel Production in WA using a GIS Model, was prepared for the WA Government-funded Centre for Research into Energy for Sustainable Transport (CREST) and is the first WA-wide study of its kind. Professor Borowitzka, a leading world authority on algal biofuel production, said WA had several key advantages for suitable sites: abundant sunshine, extensive land unsuitable for agriculture and plenty of water in the Indian Ocean. "But not all of WA is ideal for such plants, so we examined sites scientifically by assessing land suitability, access to infrastructure and workforce, carbon dioxide availability − along with nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus − and climate," Professor Borowitzka said. Assistant Professor Boruff added: "Commercial success depends on economically viable, large-scale production, which is why this study is so important." Professor Borowitzka said more research and development was needed to find the most energy-efficient and economically feasible way to extract and convert algal biomass into renewable bioenergy. Limited world fossil fuel resources and an ever-increasing global demand for energy have prompted substantial interest in renewable biofuels. Professor Borowitzka has been at the forefront of research into producing biofuels from algae. Algal biofuels − especially liquid fuels produced from algae oils − are seen as an important component of a future clean biofuels mix, he said. Its fast growth rate and high oil content appears to make microalgae particularly well-suited to renewable biodiesel production and offers an attractive sustainable alternative source to other compounds such as carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polysaccharides. WA already has the world's biggest commercial microalgae production plant at Hutt Lagoon, north of Geraldton. Provided by Murdoch University Ads by Google 1 view popular send feedback to editors not rated yet   1 2 3 4 5 Filter FilterOff Move the slider to adjust rank threshold, so that you can hide some of the comments. Display comments: newest first Dug Sep 10, 2012 Rank: not rated yet "Algal biofuels − especially liquid fuels produced from algae oils − are seen as an important component of a future clean biofuels mix, he said." Only by the petroleum (natural gas for nitrogen and fuel for mining potassium and phosphates) and fertilizer companies that control NPK fertilizer production. A global biofuel industry is estimated to increase current NPK demand by 4X. That's great if you'd rather drive than eat. Some scientist estimate we have as little a 30 years of phosphate reserves before the scarcity of quality phosphates (ones less radioactive) at reasonable cost for NPK food production skyrocket. Today 85-95% of global food production is dependent on NPK. The poorer countries of the world are not likley to starve to death quietly and the chaos created is going to spread even more than it already has to wealthier countries. Wealth is no longer about how much gold a country has, it's about how much cheap energy and phosphates it has. report

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-suitable-sites-large-scale-algal-biofuel.html#jCp